It is sys­tem­at­i­cal­ly prefer­able to have a ter­mi­na­tion clause in the agree­ment in order to reduce ambi­gu­i­ties. Final joint agree­ments con­tain pro­vi­sions requir­ing the par­ties to make mutu­al agree­ments before denun­ci­a­tion is per­mit­ted. The main aspects of contracts/agreements are the (a) the par­ties (b) the oblig­a­tions of the par­ties © the pay­ment terms (d) the inte­gra­tion clause(s) of ter­mi­na­tion. They can be defined as: A clear­ly writ­ten and easy-to-under­stand con­tract can reduce con­fu­sion between the par­ties. How­ev­er, if a con­tract is not clear­ly draft­ed, legal issues may arise. It is there­fore impor­tant to check a con­tract thor­ough­ly or have a full audit car­ried out by a lawyer before sign­ing it. One of the impor­tant objec­tives is to main­tain a bal­ance between the inter­ests of the par­ties in order to achieve a pos­i­tive eco­nom­ic out­come and to pre­vent unfair behav­iour by one of the par­ties, which may harm the inter­ests of the oth­er par­ty. For a legal agree­ment to be effec­tive­ly drawn up, it must not only cov­er cer­tain essen­tial details, but also present them in a com­pre­hen­si­ble man­ner. A con­tract of legal con­cepts and con­cepts is often not a good idea, as it could raise ques­tions about the legit­i­mate inter­pre­ta­tion of the treaty, as well as whether there has been a “meet­ing of minds” or mutu­al agree­ment between the two parties…

.