While updates on the trade war have changed investors sharply over the past two years, the offi­cial sign­ing of the deal has been greet­ed with shrug­ging. The S&P 500 rose about 0.2%. An indi­ca­tor of semi­con­duc­tor com­pa­nies, par­tic­u­lar­ly sen­si­tive to the trade war, fell more than 1%. Chi­nese politi­cians and econ­o­mists are divid­ed over the trade war. [257] [258] [259] [260] An August 2019 NPR arti­cle indi­cat­ed that some Chi­nese lead­ers were advo­cat­ing for a quick fix to the trade war to save the Chi­nese econ­o­my, oth­ers said the coun­try must retal­i­ate against the Unit­ed States and avoid a deal at all costs. [257] The guide dis­cuss­es U.S.-China rela­tions in gen­er­al; the gen­er­al trade sit­u­a­tion between the two coun­tries and spe­cif­ic issues such as trade dis­putes and trade; the U.S. trade deficit with Chi­na; ==Despite Trump‘s claim that “trade wars are good and easy to win,” the final results of the Phase One trade deal between Chi­na and the U.S. — and the trade war that pre­ced­ed it — severe­ly hurt the U.S. econ­o­my with­out address­ing the under­ly­ing eco­nom­ic con­cerns that the trade war need­ed to address. How­ev­er, the effects of the trade war go beyond the econ­o­my. Trump‘s pri­or­i­ti­za­tion of the trade deal and depri­or­i­ti­za­tion of all oth­er dimen­sions of the rela­tion­ship cre­at­ed a more gen­er­ous envi­ron­ment for Chi­na to advance its over­seas inter­ests and repress its own peo­ple at home, cer­tain­ly know­ing that U.S.

reac­tions would be tem­pered by a pres­i­dent who was reluc­tant to lose the deal. An analy­sis pub­lished by the Wall Street Jour­nal in Octo­ber 2020 showed that the trade war has led nei­ther to the pri­ma­ry goal of reviv­ing U.S. pro­duc­tion nor to real­lo­cate pro­duc­tion from the plant.…